Electronic Chess

Chess, the royal game as it was called, needs not only great skills, but also an opponent that can display the same skills or be better skilled in the art of chess then you. The opponent is as important as the board and pieces and, regardless if they are there for teaching or competing against you, they are the ones enlivening the game. Yet, what can you do when you want badly to play a chess game, but there is nobody around to compete with? Or what is the solution when you want to learn chess but you do not have enough time to attend regular chess classes?

The answer to both questions is simple: electronic chess or chess computer. Electronic chess uses the “artificial intelligence” to create an opponent fom you. Most electronic chess devices come with a physical chessboard and pieces, just like normal chess sets. The difference is that they have extra sensors in the pieces as well as in the chess board which are connected to an inner computer. When a piece is moved on the table, the computer “feels” the move, analyzes it and in a matter of few seconds or sometimes minutes you will see the next move on the display. Move the opponents piece to the indicated place and start thinking of your next move.

Electronic chess devices come with different skill levels, ranging from beginner (with the option “teach”) and ending with expert. All you need to do is set your skill level and compete against an equally strong opponent. If you are a beginner you can set your electronic chess to “teach” function and start learning new moves and strategies which will help you. Some devices have vocal instructions for a better interaction. Also, you can play different types of chess, starting with casual and blitz and ending with full tournaments.

The best thing about electronic chesses is that you can play alone (as described previously), but you can also challenge a friend. Just set up the mode for two players and the computer will automatically become a referee (a highly objective one, we may add).

Not all electronic chess devices come with board and pieces. Some have been developed so that they can be highly portable and offer quality entertainment regardless of the place you are. You can see the chessboard on a touchscreen display and make your moves using a special pen. This may not be the classical chess experience you are used to, but it is definitely a good way to practice and learn more about the art of chess.

Chess has been around for more than 1500 years. It has suffered alterations throughout the centuries, but nothing has taken its elegance and distinction away. Even nowadays, regardless if played normally or computer assisted, this is by far one of the most challenging games available. The Computer chess only makes it more available to people who have few times or fellow chess players to exercise their skills.